Tutorial

Syntactic Sugar ($)

Powerful as it may be, the move() method is also a little verbose. Consider a 4-axis move:

ayva.move({
  axis: 'stroke',
  to: 0,
  speed: 0.25
},{
  axis: 'twist',
  to: 0,
},{
  axis: 'roll',
  to: 0.4,
},{
  axis: 'pitch',
  to: 0.2,
});

Ayva provides some syntactic sugar to streamline such statements.

Move Builders

A move builder provides a way to construct moves using method chaining. The example at the beginning of this section rewritten using a move builder would be:

ayva.moveBuilder()
  .stroke(0, 0.25)
  .twist(0)
  .roll(0.4)
  .pitch(0.2).execute();

Try it out!

moveBuilder() creates a special builder object with functions for each axis specified in the configuration (both name and alias). Each function is overloaded to allow creating a movement for that axis in ways that are more succinct. When a move is created, it is added to the builder's internal list of moves, and then the builder itself is returned to allow for chaining.

The execute() method of a builder internally calls the move() method to actually perform all of the moves.

$ Property

Every Ayva instance has a special property—$—that contains subproperties for each axis specified in the configuration (both name and alias). These properties can be used as functions to create move builders:

// The same example using $ shorthand.
ayva.$.stroke(0, 0.25)
  .twist(0)
  .roll(0.4)
  .pitch(0.2).execute();

We will use this special property instead of moveBuilder() for the remainder of this tutorial.

Builder Methods

This section documents all the forms a builder's axis methods can take:

[axis](to, speed, value)

// Builder <to, speed, value>
ayva.$.stroke(0, 1, Ayva.RAMP_PARABOLIC).execute();

// move() equivalent
ayva.move({
  axis: 'stroke',
  to: 0,
  speed: 1,
  value: Ayva.RAMP_PARABOLIC
});

[axis](to, speed)

// Builder <to, speed>
ayva.$.stroke(0, 1).execute();

// move() equivalent
ayva.move({
  axis: 'stroke',
  to: 0,
  speed: 1
});

[axis](to, value)

// Builder.  <to, speed> and <to, value>
ayva.$.stroke(0, 1).twist(0, Ayva.RAMP_LINEAR).execute();

// move() equivalent
ayva.move({
  axis: 'stroke',
  to: 0,
  speed: 1
},{
  axis: 'twist',
  to: 0,
  value: Ayva.RAMP_LINEAR
});

Note: In this example, the stroke axis uses the (to, speed) form while the twist axis uses the (to, value) form—omitting speed to synchronize with the stroke axis. See the Auto Synchronization section of the multiaxis movement documentation.

[axis](to)

// Builder <to, speed> and <to>
ayva.$.stroke(0, 1).twist(0).execute();

// move() equivalent
ayva.move({
  to: 0,
  speed: 1
},{
  axis: 'twist',
  to: 0
});

[axis](value, duration)

// Example value provider that yields a 60 BPM oscillating motion.
const sinProvider = ({ x }) => (Math.sin(x * Math.PI * 2 * 60) + 1) / 2; 

// Builder <value, duration>
ayva.$.twist(sinProvider, 60).execute();

// move() equivalent
ayva.move({
  axis: 'twist',
  duration: 60,
  value: sinProvider
});

[axis](value)

// Example value provider that yields a 60 BPM oscillating motion.
const sinProvider = ({ x }) => (Math.sin(x * Math.PI * 2 * 60) + 1) / 2;

// Builder <value, duration> and <value>
ayva.$.stroke(sinProvider, 60).twist(sinProvider).execute();

// move() equivalent
ayva.move({
  duration: 60,
  value: sinProvider
},{
  axis: 'twist',
  value: sinProvider
});

[axis](object)

// Builder <object>
// Any property that is available for objects passed to move() can be used here as well (except for 'axis')
ayva.$.stroke({ to: 0, duration: 1}).execute();

// move() equivalent
ayva.move({
  axis: 'stroke',
  to: 0,
  duration: 1
});

Reusability

Move builders can be held onto and executed as many times as you like. The following example performs a bouncy stroke with a twist by constructing two reusable moves and repeatedly executing them in a loop:

const upStroke = ayva.$.stroke(1, 2, Ayva.RAMP_NEGATIVE_PARABOLIC).twist(0.25);
const downStroke = ayva.$.stroke(0.25, 2, Ayva.RAMP_PARABOLIC).twist(0.75);

// Perform 10 bouncy twist strokes.
for (let i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  upStroke.execute();
  downStroke.execute();
}

Try it out!

Live Updates with $

The axis subproperties of the special property $ can also be used to perform live updates if necessary. You can get and set the value of an axis directly through the value property.

console.log(ayva.$.stroke.value); // 0.5 - the starting value.

// Perform a live update. 0.4 will be converted to TCode and output to the device immediately.
ayva.$.stroke.value = 0.4;

This is useful if you want to perform your own live control algorithms, or for certain axes for which a "move" doesn't make sense (i.e. setting the suck algorithm):

// Set the suck algorithm to close to 0.8 on the up strokes.
ayva.$.suck.value = 0.8;

Whew!

That's all for the Motion API! The next tutorial will cover a layer of abstraction built on top of all of this—the Behavior API. 😊